Right Now in Techstuff

Today, it's possible to manipulate photos and videos in ways that were unthinkable just a few years ago. We look at a research project that uses computers and AI to map the movements of professional dancers to the images of people who have two left feet.

The Boring Podcast

How do tunneling machines work? We look at the science and tech behind burrowing under the Earth.      

TechStuff Classic: TechStuff Adjusts the Thermostat

What are the parts of a thermostat? How do bimetallic thermometers work? What is a mercury switch? In this episode, Chris and Jonathan break down the mechanics of thermostats. Tune in to learn what happens when you flip that mysterious switch on the wall.

DARPA in the 1970s

How did DARPA navigate the choppy political waters in the wake of the Vietnam War and the rise of the counterculture movement? From a re-branding to a new focus on stealth technology, we look at DARPA's work in the 1970s.

DARPA and Vietnam

As the situation in southeast Asia deteriorated, DARPA would conduct numerous research programs in an effort to get a better understanding of war and weapons capabilities, to varying degrees of success.

DARPA's First Projects

From weather satellites to horrifying herbicides, we explore some of DARPA's projects during its first years of operations. How was this agency meant to counteract missile attacks and insurgent uprisings?

The Origins of DARPA

How did a Soviet satellite kickstart the R&D branch of the US Department of Defense? We look at how DARPA was founded and the problems it was meant to solve.

TechStuff Classic: The Story of Rim

What is Research in Motion? What did the company do before inventing the Blackberry? Why do so many people direct criticism at RIM today? Tune in as Jonathan and Chris answer these questions and more in this long-awaited episode.

Robots are People Too?

An ongoing debate in Europe concerns whether or not we should extend the concept of personhood to robots. Why would we do such a thing and what would it mean? And why are many computer scientists opposed to the idea?

The End Of The World with Josh Clark: Preview

The End Of The World with Josh Clark is a 10-part podcast series on existential risks – threats that could bring humanity to a sudden and untimely end in the near future. Check out this preview, featuring a clip about our potential to spread from Earth. Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, or on the iHeartRadio app, or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Goodbye, Kepler Telescope

NASA launched the Kepler telescope in 2009 to stare out into space. In October, 2018, the telescope "retired." What did we learn from it and how did it work?

John von Neumann and the Bomb

We continue our story about John von Neumann, the mathematical genius. From his work on the Manhattan Project to creating what we now call von Neumann architecture, we learn how his work changed the world.

Who was John von Neumann?

The Hungarian-born mathematician John von Neumann made numerous contributions to mathematics, computer science and more in his relatively short life. In this episode, we learn about his meteoric rise in academia.

TechStuff Classic: How Metal Detectors Works

What are the three types of metal detectors? How do metal detectors use electromagnetism to detect stuff? What kind of stuff can create interference when using a metal detector? Tune in as Jonathan and Chris explore the technology behind metal detectors.

The Complicated Story of an AI Artist

In October, 2018, a portrait created by an artificial intelligence program sold at auction for more than $400,000. But there's controversy surrounding the story - did the team that created the work of art steal the artist?

TechStuff's Spooky Halloween Spectacular!

In celebration of Halloween, we take a look at an article from HowStuffWorks titled 10 Scary Modern Technologies. From drones to voices coming out of thin air, we peek under the big scary bed that is technology.

The Trials of MakerBot

What happens when a company abandons its core philosophy? MakerBot went from embracing open source to incorporating proprietary technology, alienating makers and shedding co-founders as a result. Here's what happened.

How MakerBot Was Born

MakerBot is known as the company that brought 3D printing into the consumer market. We learn about how the company was spawned from a project intended to turn the manufacturing world upside down.

TechStuff Classic: How Theremins Work

So what exactly is a theremin? It's got an unmistakably unique sound, and it's one of the world's first electronic musical instruments. Join Chris and Jonathan as they explore all things theremin, from the story of its inventor to playing techniques.

Sleepy Time Tech

What happens when sleep and technology meet? From sleep trackers to the world's first "sleep robot," we look at the science behind sleeping and the tech that tries to exploit it.